Intensive Course in Controlled Substance Prescribing: Pain, Anxiety & Insomnia

Controlled substances are prescribed and dispensed today at an increasing rate to help patients cope with pain, insomnia, anxiety, depression, ADHD, and a myriad of other disorders. Studies show that most practitioners are rather conservative when prescribing controlled drugs while a small number are at times overly aggressive. In addition, controlled prescription medications are falling into the hands of increasing numbers of prescription drug abusers.

This enduring material has been developed to enhance the physician’s ability to effectively prescribe controlled medications while minimizing their misuse whenever possible. Health Professionals interested in learning more on controlled substance prescribing may attend the intensive, three day live interactive course at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. (See details)



Click to view a preview of the Scams presentation


Click to view a preview of the Legal presentation

Course Agenda

Introduction: No Fee

  1. Introduction: Prescription Drug Abuse Overview (1.0 Hour Credit)
    Theodore Parran, MD

Core: $150 for all three parts
How to Prescribe Controlled Drugs in a Substance Abuse Epidemic: How to Protect Yourself, Your Patients and Your Community

  1. Part One: Chemical Dependence Overview (1.5 Hours Credit)
    Theodore Parran, MD
  2. Part Two: Legal Issues: Perspective of Risk Management (1.5 Hours Credit)
    John Irwin, JD, MD, FCLM
  3. Part Three: Patient Scams (0.5 Hour Credit)
    Theodore Parran, MD

In Partnership With

AMCNO

 

 

AMEF Academy of Medicine Education Foundation

 

Ted Parran, MD

Thank you to the Academy of Medicine Education Foundation


Release Date: November 1, 2017
Expiration Date: November 1, 2020

Faculty

Course Director
Theodore V. Parran, Jr., MD, FACP
Carter and Isabel Wong Professor of Medical Education
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Dr. Parran reports no financial relationship with a commercial interest relevant to this activity.

John R. Irwin, JD, MD, FCLM
Attorney at Law
Dr. Irwin reports no financial relationship with a commercial interest relevant to this activity.


Acknowledgment

AMCNO

AMEF Academy of Medicine Education Foundation

The ongoing opioid epidemic is a top priority for physicians and organized medicine. To address the problem head-on, this course has been designed for physicians in all specialties, to help them increase their knowledge and ability to effectively prescribe controlled medications that have abuse potential, with the intention to curb opioid abuse and addiction.

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine would like to thank the Academy of Medicine Education Foundation for providing the grant support that made this program possible. The Foundation is the charitable component of the Academy of Medicine of Cleveland & Northern Ohio—the regional medical society that has united Northern Ohio physicians to respond to the needs of the profession since 1824.

Target Audience

Designed for health professionals in all specialties who need or wish to increase their knowledge and ability to effectively prescribe controlled medications that have abuse potential. In addition, the activity is designed for physicians who treat chronic pain syndromes.

Learning Objectives

After participating in this activity participants will be able to:

  • Describe the pharmacologic profiles of benzodiazepines, opiates and other controlled drugs
  • Identify the diagnostic criteria for substance abuse, anxiety disorder, acute and chronic pain, insomnia, and depression
  • Employ interviewing techniques relating to the diagnosis and management of substance abuse in general and prescription drug abusers in particular
  • Discuss case management strategies for the above diagnoses
  • Discuss beliefs, stereotypes, and attitudes about controlled substance prescribing, controlled drug abusers, and chemical dependency, and consider the therapeutic implications of treatments based on these beliefs

Media

Recorded slides and audio presentation. Resource materials may include downloads of videos, print materials, slides or web pages.

Planning Committee

Course Director
Theodore V. Parran, Jr., MD, FACP
Carter and Isabel Wong Professor of Medical Education
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Dr. Parran reports no financial relationship with a commercial interest relevant to this activity.

Amy Ross Pisman
Director
Continuing Medical Education Program
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Ms. Pisman reports no financial relationship with a commercial interest relevant to this activity.

Accreditation Statement

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 4.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Disclosure Statement

The policy of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine CME Program (CWRU CME) requires that the Activity Director, planning committee members and all activity faculty (that is, anyone in a position to control the content of the educational activity) disclose to the activity participants all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. Where disclosures have been made, conflicts of interest, real or apparent, must be resolved. Disclosure will be made to activity participants prior to the commencement of the activity. CWRU CME also requires that faculty make clinical recommendations based on the best available scientific evidence and that faculty identify any discussion of “off-label” or investigational use of pharmaceutical products or medical devices.

Instructions

To receive a statement of credit for up to 4.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ you must:

  1. Review and reflect on the full content of the recorded session.
  2. Successfully complete the post-test. A score of 75% is required for passage.
  3. Complete the evaluation.

Your credits will be recorded by the CWRU CME Program and made a part of your cumulative transcript.

Estimated Time to Complete this Educational Activity

Including review of any resource material and completion of the post-test, this activity is expected to take 4.50 hours to complete.

Fee

The fee for the Core: How to Prescribe Controlled Drugs in a Substance Abuse Epidemic: How to Protect Yourself, Your Patients and Your Community is $150. There is no fee for the Introduction – Prescription Drug Abuse Overview.

To contact the CME Provider: Email CWRU CME at medcme@case.edu

Medical Disclaimer

Medicine is an ever-changing science. As new research and clinical experience broaden our knowledge, changes in treatment and drug therapy are required. The authors have checked with sources believed to be reliable in their efforts to provide information that is complete and generally in accord with the standards accepted at the time of publication.
Although every effort is made to ensure that this material is accurate and up-to-date, it is provided for the convenience of the user and should not be considered definitive. Since medicine is an ever-changing science, neither the authors nor Case Western Reserve School of Medicine nor any other party who has been involved in the preparation or publication of this work warrants that the information contained herein is in every respect accurate or complete, and they are not responsible for any errors or omissions or for the results obtained from the use of such information.
Readers are encouraged to confirm the information contained herein with other sources. This information should not be construed as personal medical advice and is not intended to replace medical advice offered by physicians. Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine will not be liable for any direct, indirect, consequential, special, exemplary, or other damages arising therefrom.

Resources:

  1. https://addiction.surgeongeneral.gov/surgeon-generals-report.pdf
  2. http://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/overdose.html
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/opioids/index.html
  4. https://www.hsdl.org/c/2016-national-drug-threat-assessment/
  5. UNODC, World Drug Report 2012, NSDUH Series H‐46, HHH Publication No. (SMA) 13‐4795
    https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUHresults2012/NSDUHresults2012.pdf
  6. CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.rr6501e1
  7. Schuckit MA. Treatment of opioid-use disorders. New England Journal of Medicine. 2016 Jul 28;375(4):357-68.
  8. Dowell D, Kunins HV, Farley TA. Opioid analgesics—risky drugs, not risky patients. Jama. 2013 Jun 5;309(21):2219-20.
  9. Annals of Internal Medicine • Vol. 164 No. 1 • 5 January 2016
  10. Parran TV, Jasinski DR. Intravenous methylphenidate abuse: prototype for prescription drug abuse. Archives of internal medicine. 1991 Apr 1;151(4):781-3.
  11. Longo LP, Parran Jr T, Johnson B, Kinsey W. Addiction: part II. Identification and management of the drug-seeking patient. American family physician. 2000 Apr;61(8):2401-8.